Fresh Provisions

"At Fresh Provisions we are passionate about supplying local fresh produce that meets our customers dietary and ethical food requirements. Dirty Clean Food offers a premium 100% grass-fed beef and lamb that is ethically raised and locally sourced and our customers love it!" Tom Katselas

Short Order Burger Co.

"Quality and provenance is paramount when selecting the ingredients to include in our burgers. DCF provides us with premium 100% grass-fed beef that is ethically raised and locally sourced." Simon Kony, Owner

Peaches Fresh Food

"At Peaches Fresh Food we offer a huge range of the freshest and best produce in WA. What we love about Dirty Clean Food is their regenerative story, supplying us with grass-fed meat of the highest quality whilst taking care of the land for future generations." Nadia Di Tullio

Stockists

We are thrilled to be supplying some of the best chefs and independent retailers in WA. We would love you to support them, secure in the knowledge that the beef and lamb you are served is ethically raised and grown by farmers committed to regenerating the world...and it tastes fantastic!

Know Your Lamb

Ever wondered where your loin chops come from? Why Lamb Tenderloin and Backstrap were a little more prized than some other cuts? What's the difference between the Foreshank and Hindshank - aren't they all just shanks?? 
We feel that knowing where your food comes from is an integral part of appreciating and understanding the supply chain - it's also the easiest thing that you as a consumer can do. On this page, we have broken the lamb down (literally) into its primal cuts and a short description of each product. We hope you find this useful, and helps you to make informed choices. 

A whole lamb broken down into its primal cuts. 

Neck

 Lamb Neck Rosettes from the neck with the central bone kept in. Made up of well-exercised muscle, they contain plenty of connective tissue. This cut is best suited to moist, low and slow cooking methods to break down the connective tissue and allow the bone to impart a rich flavour, resulting in pull-apart tenderness. 

     

    Shoulder

    The Banjo Cut Shoulder is named due to its oval shape after removal of the scapular and ribs from the square cut shoulder. The shoulder has more flavour and is easier to cook than lamb leg. Virtually foolproof, minimal effort, and incredible meat that is so tender that you won’t need a knife to carve it. The Banjo is equally at home in the slow cooker, a low oven, smoker or BBQ.

     

     

    Diced Lamb generally comes from the shoulder, a working muscle which makes it a less tender but a very flavourful part of the lamb. A perfect cut therefore for slow moist cooking methods, just add your favourite seasonal vegetables and herbs for a hearty, economical meal.

       

       

      Lamb Stir Fry Strips, like your Diced Lamb, comes from the shoulder. Low in fat, suitable for hard and fast cooking. Simply add a few simple veggies to make a flavoursome, easy, healthy family meal. 

       

       

       

      Our Lamb Shoulder Roast is boned, trimmed, rolled and ready to go! The shoulder is a well-exercised area and is rich in flavour. Perfect to pair with garlic and rosemary it is best cooked slowly, either roasted or braised.  Compared to a leg of lamb the slightly higher fat content results in a very tender, succulent eat. The Mini Lamb Roast is a smaller version this.

       

       

      Our Lamb Chorizo sausage is a refreshing take on a classic. They are perfect sliced or diced or eaten whole, eaten as tapas or scattered on a pizza, or thrown into a casserole or soup: what you’ll get is a huge hit of spicy, smoky flavour and an excellent textural element to any dish. Made with our tasty Grass Fed lamb shoulder, our lamb chorizo is a winner whichever way you look at it.

       

        Forequarter

        As its name suggests, the Lamb Chops (Forequarter Chops) are derived from the forequarters, which incorporates the neck, shank and shoulder rack. This economical cut is flexible when it comes to cooking - BBQ, grilled or slow cooked by braising, stewing or slow roasting.Serve this with a side of cauliflower mash or green bean salad. Now you’re ready to take on any meal during the week!

         

         

          Backstrap

          The Lamb Backstrap is a lean and extremely tender cut of meat. It is taken from the middle of the lamb’s loin and contains the eye muscle running along the spine.Season generously with salt and pepper, pan-fry each side for three minutes on each side, remove from the pan and cover loosely with foil for a few minutes. This will result in a deliciously tender and juicy lamb.

           

           

            Ribs

            The Lamb Rack contains rib bones, backbone and the rib eye muscle. You have the option of roasting the rack whole or separating it into cutlets - either way, it is the most luxurious cut of lamb. The rack is frenched, taking out the hard work and ensuring restaurant style presentation. If you prefer smaller portions, we also have the Frenched Lamb Cutlets.

             

             

            There is no graceful way to eat Lamb Ribs, but it is always worth it! Cut from the breast or belly, it is made up of layers of fat and meat. The meat on the ribs is close to the bone making them full of flavour.


               

               

                Breast & Flap (Belly)

                Perfectly balanced flavors make our Lamb with Rosemary Sausages and Moroccan Spice Sausages with really wide appeal!  Freshly ground grass fed lamb made from leg or shoulder, balanced off with trim that can come from the belly. It is carefully blended with binders, and delicate spices for a firm, meaty bite and mild flavour.

                 

                 

                  Shin, Foreshanks & Hindshanks

                  Stock up on this beautiful option for autumn and winter. The Foreshanks come from the lower part of the front leg they are some of the hardest working muscles in the body, so they need to cook for a goodly while over a low heat for best results. So lean and tasty they are perfect for braising, stewing, pot roasting or making delicious soups. 

                  Cut from the hindquarters, Hindshanks (pictured) are cut from the area of meat and bone that sits above the knee joint and below the leg. One of winter's most loved dishes, lamb shanks fill the house with their delicious aroma as they bubble away 'til they're falling-off-the-bone.  Surprisingly easy to prepare, they have a fabulous texture and rich flavour which pairs beautifully with creamy mashed potato and colourful steamed vegetables.

                  Lamb Osso Buco is Italian for "bone with a hole", a reference to the marrow hole at the center of the cross-cut lamb shin. Slowly simmer with vegetables, white wine, and seasoned stock for a tender taste sensation. Due to its richness and big flavors, Osso Buco goes well with creamy types of side dishes like risotto, creamy polenta, or good old mashed spud!

                   

                    Loin

                    Loin Chops are a great way to satisfy that lamb craving. Resembling mini-T-Bones, it is prepared from the short loin, which sits behind the rack and before the leg. Prized for their tenderness, cook them on the frying pan or grill on the barbecue for a caramelised crust with a pink, juicy centre. Super easy to prepare and perfect all year 'round.

                     

                      Tenderloin

                      The Tenderloin comes from an area that does very little work. It has virtually no fat or connective tissue and is one of the most tender cuts of lamb. This highly prized cut is delicate in flavour and suits gentle and dry cooking.This easy-to-prepare-and-cook cut can be seasoned and popped onto a hot pan, served alongisde with salsa verde. What a treat!

                       

                        Leg

                        The Lamb Rump Steaks comes from the lower back of the lamb, otherwise known as the chump, where the top of leg meets the loin. It's a plump yet lean cut, with a generous layer of fat to keep the meat juicy. Rump steaks are really versatile and work well with marinades or sliced in pastas and salads.

                         

                        Lamb Leg Steaks come from the leaner part of the leg, making them flavoursome and tender. They are best grilled, griddled, pan-fried or sauteed.  They are also quick, easy and delicious on the BBQ in the summer.

                         

                         

                         

                        The Butterflied Lamb Leg is merely a leg that has its bone removed and cut in a way that allows a uniform thickness - conviniently reducing cooking time, marinates well and has the benefit of picking up char from the grill. Its robust meaty flavour makes a superb roast in winter and a perfect addition to any summer BBQ.

                         

                         

                        The Easy Carve Leg is made from the hindquarter and is prepared by removing the bone and surrounding fat before removing the shank. Sear it in the pan before slow cooking to seal in all its juice and flavour. Leave your dinner guests drooling with this family favourite - a visual feast and a flavourful one. Not only is it easier to carve but it is moist, tender and faster cooking.

                         

                         

                         

                        Our Lamb Mince is made from the leg or the shoulder. Full of flavour and a great everyday staple. Perfect in succulent meatballs, sausage rolls, burgers and shepherd's pie variations, or more exotic dishes like koftas and moussaka or pilaf.

                         

                         

                         

                        Packed with protein, our premium lamb leg and shoulder is simply minced and blended with herbs, then formed into generous Lamb Burger Patties to make your life easy! They are gluten free with no artificial colours, flavours or additives.

                         

                         

                         

                        A whole lamb divided into its primal cuts, showing where each DCF product comes from.